This page provides the brief description of the reports that have been published by different national and international institutions. Those studies and reports present impacts of the Turkish coal plans and existing coal threat in health, climate change and economy.

Coal Report: Turkey’s Coal Policies Related to Climate Change, Economy and Health – Istanbul Policies Center / Sabanci University

This report addresses the current status of coal in Turkey as an energy and greenhouse gas source, its impacts on health, the association between increasing the share of coal in electricity generation and climate and economic policies, and the discussions on “clean coal.” The online version of the report: link

Turkey’s Renewable Power: Alternative Power Supply Scenarios for Turkey – Bloomberg New Energy Finance

The report analyses the Turkish energy  system and addresses to answer the critical question: Is it possible to ensure both environmental sustainability and a cleaner, cost-comparative energy mix, while progressing towards the goal of suffi cient and secure energy provision? the online version of the report: link

Health Perspectives:

 

Silent Killers: Why Turkey Must Replace Coal Power Projects With Green Energy – Greenpeace Med 

The report commissioned by Greenpeace uncover the health impacts of the health risks of coal plants in Turkey. The online version version of the report: link

The Unpaid Health Bill: How Coal Plants in Turkey makes us sick – Health and Environment Alliance

Massive investment in coal power plants is planned in Turkey. This report produced by the Health and Environment Alliance (HEAL) aims to provide an overview of the scientific evidence of how air pollution impacts health and how emissions from coal power plants in Turkey are implicated in this. It estimates that air pollution from the 19 coal-fired power plants that were in operation in 2012 caused health costs of up to 3.6 billion EUR a year. A quadrupling of coal power capacity as planned, some 80 new coal power plants, would lead to skyrocketing health costs for current and future generations. The report includes testimonies from leading health and medical experts on why they are concerned. It also develops recommendations for policy-makers and the health community on how to address the unpaid health bill and ensure that it is taken into account in future energy decisions in Turkey. The online version of the report: link

Tool Kit: Coal power generation and health in Iskenderun Bay, Turkey –  Health and Environment Alliance

The Health and Environment Alliance (HEAL) has brought together evidence on how coal power generation harms health, and what the state of the environment and health is in the Iskenderun Bay region. HEAL also provides several suggestions on how to communicate on health threats and the evidence with different audiences, based on our tested and trialled communication at local, national and European level. Last but not least, examples of successful activities of health groups in Turkey and at international level are given, as well as quotes from leading health experts. The online version of the report: link

Air Pollution in Turkey: Dark Report – Right to Clean Air Platform (only in turkish).

The report presents the current situation of air pollution in Turkey, its health impacts and the role of coal combustion for energy in air pollution. The online version of the report (only in Turkish): link

Economic Perspectives:

 

Turkey at a Crossroads: Invest in old energy economy or new? – IEEFA

A report by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) concludes that Turkey is at risk of making an historic error in energy policy by investing heavily in a new fleet of lignite-fired electricity plants. The study estimates that a lignite-fueled buildout being pursued by the Turkish government would cost at least $1.1 billion and perhaps as much as $2 billion in annual public subsidies and that it would increase electricity prices by 19 percent to 29 percent. the online version of the report: link

Energy Policies and Their Impacts on Investments – TEPAV

The Economic Policy Research Foundation of Turkey (TEPAV) has conducted a new analysis based on interviews with 70 companies holding energy utilities in Turkey and analyzed their energy investment decisions and perceptions behind these decisions about the investment climate. The report shows widespread lack of confidence in Turkish coal investments among energy companies The online version of the report: link

Turkey’s Compliance with the Industrial Emissions Directive – TEPAV

The report addresses the compliance of Turkey with the Industrial Emissions Directive of European Union. The report presents the legislation gap analysis and its possible costs on Turkish energy sector. The online version of the report: link 

Green Energy Finance Prospects for Turkey – EDAM

On the eve of the Paris Climate Change Agreement, the issue of climate finance still stands at the heart of the global climate change discussion. In Paris, the developed states reiterated their promise to raise the levels of climate finance flows into the developing world to 100 billion US dollars by the year 2020. However, several major question marks still remain regarding the specifics of this pledge. In this EDAM research paper, Research Assistant Gökşin Bavbek highlights the existing controversies regarding global climate finance and underlines the major sources of finance. Additionally, the report focuses on Turkey’s current climate finance outlook and its prospects for attracting increased amounts of finance. The online version of the study: link

Carbon Taxation Information Note – EDAM

Carbon taxation is a policy mechanism that is becoming more widespread around the globe as the negative effects of climate change continue to be recognized. In this EDAM Information Note, Research Assistant Gökşin Bavbek provides a basic overview of the carbon taxation mechanism and details the countries that are currently implementing the policy tool. Additionally, a brief comparison of the carbon taxation mechanism is made with other carbon pricing options such as carbon trading. Carbon taxation also needs to be considered by Turkey as a policy option in its bid to devise a comprehensive policy framework that will align the energy needs of the country with its climate change responsibilities. The online version of the study: link

Design Options for Employing a Carbon Tax in Turkey – EDAM

In this EDAM policy paper, Research Assistant Gökşin Bavbek analyzes the main design elements that should be considered in the potential adoption of a carbon tax in Turkey. The main issues included in the report are the determination of the tax rate, determination of the scope of the tax in terms of sectors and gases, the utilization of the revenues generated by the tax and possible ways to mitigate the potential negative effects of the tax. In the final part of the paper, several policy recommendations are also included with the aim of achieving the highest level of carbon mitigation with the least cost.  The online version of the study: link

Assessing the Potential Effect of a Carbon Tax in Turkey – EDAM

The adoption of a carbon tax can potentially help Turkey in achieving a considerable level of GHG mitigation. It would also have significant effects in the general make-up of the economy, particularly in the energy sector. In this policy paper written by EDAM Research Assistant Gökşin Bavbek, the potential effects of a carbon tax adoption in Turkey are analyzed based on different scenarios. The issues covered include the potential amount of revenues collected,  impacts on GHG mitigation, impacts on the electricity generation mix and impacts on the import dependence of the country in energy sources. The online version of the report: link

The Costs of Coal Plants: An Alternative Analysis – Ecology Collective Association

The report carries out a comprehensive evaluation of five coal-fired energy plants (CENAL Entegre Enerji Santrali, SOCAR Power Termik Santrali, HEMA Termik Santrali, DOSAB Buhar ve Enerji Üretim Tesisi ve SANKO Gölbaşı Termik Santrali), whose finalized EIA reports have been submitted to the ministry, and aim to illuminate the dimensions of their social, ecological and economic costs that remain hidden. The online version of the report: link

Climate Change and Climate Policies, Legislation

 

Co-benefits of Climate Action: Assessing Turkey’s Climate Pledge 2016, CAN Europe, Climate Network Turkey, New Climate Institute

The aims at identifying for Turkey the co-benefits of policies compatible with the fight against climate change throughout the sections on job creation, public health and dependency on energy imports. The analysis shows that if Turkey adopts a pathway that prioritizes renewable energy and energy efficiency in line with the 1.5°C and 2°C targets, it can considerably reduce energy import dependency, can create tens of thousands of qualified jobs in the renewable energy sector and can prevent thousands of premature deaths from air pollution. The online version of the report: link

Coal and Climate Change 2016 – Önder Algedik

The report examines how Turkish thermal plants and coal focused energy policy contributes the countries GHG profile and hence triggers climate change.

The online version of the report: link 

Financing Coal: High Carbon Arithmetic of Turkey 2015  – Önder Algedik

The report aims to define the role of coal in the general energy data within the frame of Turkey’s high-carbon economy policies, the coal thermal plants and policies. It examined the development of coal plants, including the candidate plants that exist and that are in the permission process and combined three headings: energy – coal – climate change including the greenhouse gas projections.

The online version of the report: link

Electricity Production with Royalty Model; Climate Change with Royalty Model – Önder Algedik

The report investigates the role of royalty model in coal and energy production in Turkey. According to study, in order to bring the new coal reserves to economy, more production and consumption models are supported and developed. While coal production through royalty was only 447 thousand tons in 2004, they reached 4,3 million tons in 2014.  The online version of the report: link

Integrating Industrial Policy with Climate Change Policy: The Case for Turkey – EDAM

In this EDAM research paper, the relationship between climate change policy and industrial policy is analyzed from a theoretical perspective. The concept of green industrial policy is examined along with its main components and the basic policy tools used for pursuing such a policy are detailed along with the main principles that need to be considered when devising such policies. The concepts of green growth and green industry are also key for Turkey which has considerable economic development needs and responsibilities in combating climate change. the online version of the study: link

Integrating Industrial Policy with Climate Change Policy: Country Case Studies -EDAM

In this EDAM research paper, Research Assistant Gökşin Bavbek investigates the interrelationship between climate change policy and industrial policy through analyzing several case studies from different countries across the world. The concept of green industry is examined with a focus on the role green industries can play in achieving economic development and creating employment opportunities. The case studies include policy examples from the USA, Germany, China, India and Brazil. The online version of the study: link

Turkey’s Compliance with the Industrial Emissions Directive – TEPAV

The report addresses the compliance of Turkey with the Industrial Emissions Directive of European Union. The report presents the legislation gap analysis and its possible costs on Turkish energy sector. The online version of the report: link 

Energy Policies as a part of environmental planning in Turkey – Ecology Collective (only in Turkish)

The report investigates the relationship between the energy policies and the legal environmental planning processes in Turkey. the online version of the report (only in turkish): link